Write the ideal investor resume with this simple guide

When you're an investor, the chances are that you're the one calling the shots. Of course, you might want a role with a prominent investment firm, working on their strategies on their behalf. However, even if you work alone and you're the one that decides where you spend your time, money, and effort, it's still worth having an up-to-date resume.

For the purpose of outside investment, you need to be able to sell yourself. Think of shows like Shark Tank. If you're a regular viewer, you'll have lost count of the number of times a candidate accepts an offer because they've always dreamed of working with a specific shark. They know their backstories, their attitude to business, and how they might be helpful when taking a business forward.

The chances are you're not quite as famous. Sure, there'll be investment opportunities where you just need to meet the asking price, with no more questions asked. However, there'll also be times when prospective partners want more than just your money. Do you have the time, contacts, and work ethic to help them succeed? A short resume won't bring you national television exposure, but it will give those seeking funding an idea of what you represent.

Most investment resumes, of course, are for those looking for a job. Banking and finance incorporate numerous in-demand roles and attract some of the finest talents around. Obtaining the plum jobs usually requires an education history that extends far beyond just getting a certificate. Nothing beats a track record in the industry to secure the most desirable positions.

It can be difficult to even get your foot in the door for these roles, but the following investor resume tips will ensure you have the best possible chance!

1. Position education and experience depending on what stands out most

A career in investment banking may easily start straight out of college. However, major financial institutions take on hundreds of juniors each year to give themselves the best chance of finding the top talent.

If you're embarking on this career straight out of education, don't feel like you need to stick with tradition and put your work experience first. That part-time fast-food job that helped you survive college was worth it at the time, but it means little to finance recruiters. Instead, prioritize that space and devote it to when, where, and how you gained your qualifications.

Such is the industry's competitiveness that some recruiters won't even look past the institution's name. However, that's not something you can control, so state it proudly and talk about the skills you gained and the activities you undertook outside the course to demonstrate what a rounded employee you'll be.

Of course, if you've got the right qualifications, you'll have at least some experience thanks to your internship. But, even if you only have a few months of experience in the sector, there's every chance you'll have something to talk about that will immediately catch the eye.

Naturally, if you finished your education long ago and spent the last decade split between JPMorgan Chase and Goldman Sachs, your education barely matters, and your experience should rocket back to the top of your investor resume as you highlight your incredible achievements over the years.

2. Showcase your investor talents by the numbers

You wouldn't be looking for investor roles if you didn't have an outstanding grasp of the numbers. However, as with most elements of putting together a winning resume, it's all about balance. Financial firms have plenty of cash, and bankers are busy people. So the chances of a finance professional reading every resume from applicants for non-senior roles are slim, as they've got highly experienced HR teams to do that on their behalf.

While you might live and breathe numbers, they might not. Therefore, while you should definitely include numbers in your application, remember to focus on the ones that make sense in any context. For example, if, in your last role, your investment decisions made tens of millions for your employer, those numbers don't lie – and they'll almost certainly get you an interview.

In short, focus on numbers that mean something, no matter what, like this:

"Investment banker with over 15 years of experience. Successfully overseen 17 $1bn+ IPOs. Recruited and managed a team of 15 analysts and oversaw fund growth of $127 million over five years."

Your numbers will differ, but you can see how they matter on your resume. Recruiters will know what an IPO is; they'll understand that 15 analysts represent a sizeable team, and $127 million in five years is probably enough to get you a seat at the interview table in its own right!

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3. Tailor your talents to the role at hand

Junior investor roles don't change all that much. The more prominent institutions, in particular, often reuse the same job description template every time they embark on a recruitment drive. Indeed, you've probably seen it before while dreaming of a career while completing your studies if you're going for a junior role. So don't let that time go to waste, and ensure you check every box on the job description with what you can bring to the business.

While there will often be minor tweaks between roles, ensure your investor resume covers:

  • Financial planning
  • Knowledge of relevant supporting industries
  • Strategy development
  • Working IT skills
  • Relationship building and people management
  • All relevant qualifications
  • Communication skills
  • A willingness and ability to deal with external clients
  • Knowledge of industry-standard procedures and regulations
  • An ethical approach

Many financial institutions are on the lookout for talented individuals they can mold into ideal employees at junior levels.

Their working cultures date back decades in many cases, and your job is often to demonstrate you have the basics down while also having the desire to improve as you progress.

Of course, in more senior roles, you're already set in your ways and have the experience to prove it. The task on your resume then becomes demonstrating why the skills and expertise you have make you the perfect fit for the role.

In conclusion...

Overall, what might be the perfect investor resume for one role might not be a hundred percent ideal for another. So while the core skills, education, and experience don't change all that much, it's vital to retain an open mind as you approach companies that want to recruit the best talent available – just like you!

A journalist by trade, a writer by fate. Nikoleta went from writing for media outlets to exploring the world of content creation with Kickresume and helping people get closer to the job of their dreams. Her insights and career guides have been published by The Female Lead, College Recruiter, and ISIC, among others. When she’s not writing or (enthusiastically) pestering people with questions, you can find her traveling or sipping on a cup of coffee.

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